CHRISTIANS PRACTICING WISHCRAFT

CHRISTIANS PRACTICING WISHCRAFT

Dream Upon A Star

In 1979, Barbara Sher published her book Wishcraft, in which she shares advice on setting and achieving our highest goals. I learned about Sher’s book recently while reading Write It Down, Make It Happen, by Henriette Anne Klaus. Klaus once took a class from Sher and has since developed her own philosophy of achieving goals through a system of writing them down.

I guess writing down our goals is one way of achieving them. But wouldn’t it just be easier if God showed up one day and promised to give us our greatest wish, Aladdin style? Yeah, right! Fat chance!

I dream of genie

You might be surprised to learn that this actually happened. In fact, one man did have this exact experience. Solomon, the wisest and wealthiest king to ever reign in Israel, was asked by God what was his greatest wish. Here’s how it went down:

7 That night God appeared to Solomon and said, “What do you want? Ask, and I will give it to you!”

sheepish genie

Forget 3 wishes. God goes straight for the big one. Can you imagine? How wonderfully scary! Was God testing Solomon? Or did God just like Solomon so much He wanted to give him something out of love? What would you have wished for? Notice what Solomon asked:

8 Solomon replied to God…10 Give me the wisdom and knowledge to lead them (your people) properly, for who could possibly govern this great people of yours?”

Evidently, Solomon’s request pleased the Lord. Notice how God responds:

11 God said to Solomon, “Because your greatest desire is to help your people, and you did not ask for wealth, riches, fame, or even the death of your enemies or a long life, but rather you asked for wisdom and knowledge to properly govern my people— 12 I will certainly give you the wisdom and knowledge you requested. But I will also give you wealth, riches, and fame such as no other king has had before you or will ever have in the future!” – 1 Chronicles 1:1-12 (NLT)

I call this “Practicing Wishcraft”. Not Witchcraft. Witchcraft is when a person serves Satan in exchange for the ability to use the devil’s evil power to manipulate people and circumstances on earth for one’s personal benefit. Witchcraft is strictly forbidden as a practice by God. Believers are not to get involved with it. But Wishcraft is different.

Wishcraft is when we bring God our wishes and wait for Him to grant them…or not, depending on how God decides to answer.  Wishcraft takes real trust. To submit our dreams, ambitions, and deepest desires to God and then wait expectantly upon Him to either grant them or deny them, is a true test of faith. 

To be clear, I’m saying  Wishcraft is good. To bring all of your heart’s desires and lay them down at God’s feet and then trust Him that whichever ones He wants you to have or not have will be best, is true faith in action.

“Delight thyself in the Lord and He will grant thee the desires of thine heart”, says the Psalmist.

When our heart wishes this way in prayer: “Thy Kingdom come and thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven”, God can trust us enough to say to us the very same thing He said that night to Solomon, “What do you want? Ask, and I will give it to you.”

Can God trust you enough to grant you your greatest wish?

 

INDUSTRIOUS…Am I getting things done?

INDUSTRIOUS PEOPLE GET THINGS DONE
INDUSTRIOUS PEOPLE GET THINGS DONE

Someone once told me “Brad, you get out of something what you put into it.” Now that I’m 41, I can’t say I agree 100%. Sometimes, I actually can’t control “what I get out of something”.

In our fallen world, everything’s broken. Nothing works right, at least not for very long. My car stalls out. My heater breaks. My microwave fizzles. 1+1 doesn’t always = 2. Does that make sense?

For example, If you’re a person who works in the sales industry, you can usually control what you personally “put in” to a relationship with a new client, in terms of caring, time, expertise and helpfulness. But you can’t control whether that client will “buy” from you or your company in a way that “equals” your sacrificial input. Sometimes, 4+1= 2. It can be frustrating to say the least.

But while we can’t always control what we get out of something, we can always control what we put into it. Here’s the good news: although we can’t always directly control outcomes, there are three elements of our work that we can control. You can decide to be industrious no matter what. For example, YOU CAN CONTROL…

1. Your Work Ethic…How you view and feel about the work you do.

You can “take this job and love it” or you can “take this job and shove it”! It’s up to you! And your boss, eventually:) How do you feel about your work? Do you like it? Loathe it? What?

Your work ethic is what you believe about work itself. An “ethic” is another word for your basic philosophy or belief system. Your view of “work” will determine your behavior in relation to it. For example, is work a blessing or a curse to you? Is it something you avoid at all costs or dive into as often as possible? A second element you can control is…

2. Your Work Habits…When and how you discipline yourself to do your work.

I’m always fascinated to learn the daily routines and schedules of famous people. The book Daily Rituals by Mason Currey, for example, examines the daily work habits of 161 of history’s most famous creatives: men like Mark Twain, Ernest Hemingway, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Edison; along with women such as Gertrude Stein, Georgia O’Keefe and Sylvia Plath. In this book he writes about their work habits. He asks and answers questions such as: What time did they get up in the morning? Where did they do their work? When did they sleep? How many breaks did they take?

What we learn is that different people had different levels of discipline. “Discipline” says Bob Proctor, “is the ability to give yourself a command and then follow it.” Each of us has daily rituals that constitute our work habits. For the most part, these are under our control. We also have a certain level of self-discipline with which we carry out our tasks. We decide these things. We get to choose. And each of us can choose to be industrious every day. You can also choose to control…

3. Your Work Rate…How much effort you give to doing your work.

We’ve all heard the cliché’, “Work smarter not harder”. It’s catchy, but not totally accurate. No matter how “smart” you work, effort is still required of you to accomplish goals and plans. It may or may not be “manual labor” but it’s almost always “mental labor”.

Dr. Joel Fuhrman, NY Times best-selling author of Eat To Live and Super Immunity reminds us: “Things that have huge value require effort…great success means a significant effort is usually required.” 

Unfortunately, the word “effort” itself gets a bad rap. For many, it connotes “blood, tears, toil and sweat”, all things unpleasant to give at times. Gandhi saw it another way: “Satisfaction” he wrote“lies in the effort, not in the attainment. Full effort is full victory.” 

“Never let effort be the issue” says former NY Jets coach, Herman Edwards. Exert yourself. Leave a piece of yourself in your work. Even if you are afraid of failing, remember these words from philosopher Francis Bacon:

“There is no comparison between that which is lost by not succeeding and that which is lost by not trying.”